CONTINUOUS DELIVERY EBOOK

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Compre Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Confira também os eBooks mais vendidos, lançamentos e livros digitais exclusivos. “Whether or not your software development team already understands that continuous integration is every bit as necessary as source code control, this is. Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Adobe Reader) by Jez Humble, David Farley. Getting software released to users is often a painful, risky, and time-consuming process.


Continuous Delivery Ebook

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Our new continuous delivery ebook is here and ready to download. Continuous delivery has had our attention for a while, both as a set of. Lots of people have been downloading our new ebook, Continuous Delivery: What It Is and How to Get Started. Today we're announcing its. In the late 90's I paid a visit to Kent Beck, then working in Switzerland for an insurance company. He showed me around his project and one of the interesting .

He showed me around his project and one of the interesting aspects of his highly disciplined team was the fact that they deployed their software into production every night. This regular deployment gave them many advantages: In the last decade I've worked at ThoughtWorks and a common theme of our projects has been reducing that cycle time between idea and usable software.

I see plenty of project stories and they almost all involve a determined shortening of that cycle.

While we don't usually do daily deliveries into production, it's now common to see teams doing bi-weekly releases. Dave and Jez have been part of that sea-change, actively involved in projects that have built a culture of frequent, reliable deliveries. They and our colleagues have taken organizations that struggled to deploy software once a year, into the world of Continuous Delivery, where releasing becomes routine.

The foundation for the approach, at least for the development team, is Continuous Integration CI. CI keeps a development team in sync with each other, removing the delays due to integration issues. A couple of years ago Paul Duvall wrote the book on CI within this series.

Editorial Reviews

Ravi This book is language independent. It talks about principles and practices that can help you shorten the cycle of putting code from development into …more This book is language independent. It talks about principles and practices that can help you shorten the cycle of putting code from development into production.

As long as that's your objective, it does not matter which language you are using. See 2 questions about Continuous Delivery….

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order.

May 06, Yevgeniy Brikman rated it liked it. I'm a bit torn on this book: The biggest problem is the lack of real world examples.

Chapters are mostly huge blocks of advice: There need to be far more examples of real world systems with both good approaches and bad approaches dis I'm a bit torn on this book: There need to be far more examples of real world systems with both good approaches and bad approaches discussed and compared in detail. Moreover, the book is very very repetitive. Perhaps it's from an attempt to make each chapter standalone, but while trying to find the new and interesting info in a new chapter, you have to wade through tons of info you read many times in earlier chapters or even earlier paragraphs.

There are many sentences, paragraphs, and even pages that can be skipped because they are obvious or just a rehash of something earlier or both. In short, this is a VERY important - perhaps even required - read for anyone working on medium and large software projects, but this book desperately needs a tldr companion with lots of examples.

A few good quotes from the book: Without continuous integration, your software is broken until somebody proves it works, usually during a testing or integration stage. With continuous integration, your software is proven to work assuming a sufficiently comprehensive set of automated tests with every new change—and you know the moment it breaks and can fix it immediately.

For the software delivery process, the most important global metric is cycle time. This is the time between deciding that a feature needs to be implemented and having that feature released to users.

Do you do this on a repeatable, reliable basis? To paraphrase, performance is a measure of the time taken to process a single transaction, and can be measured either in isolation or under load. Throughput is the number of transactions a system can process in a given timespan. It is always limited by some bottleneck in the system. The maximum throughput a system can sustain, for a given workload, while maintaining an acceptable response time for each individual request, is its capacity.

Free Guide: Introduction to Continuous Delivery

Customers are usually interested in throughput or capacity. When we talk about components, we mean a reasonably large-scale code structure within an application, with a well-defined API, that could potentially be swapped out for another implementation. A component-based software system is distinguished by the fact that the codebase is divided into discrete pieces that provide behavior through well-defined, limited interactions with other components.

View 2 comments. This is the best book about Deployment I've read so far. Filled with lots of good advice for improvement and automation of a deployment process.

I loved the concepts about deployments with no downtime and also found their maturity model a good guideline for improvement. I definitely recommend the reading for software development folks. Jun 14, Michael Koltsov rated it liked it. This book is considered a cornerstone of the DevOps movement.

In my opinion, it might be that in the very beginning, but currently most of the concepts that it presents are obvious and outdated. I will recommend it to be read to someone who's new in the DevOps community, but if you've got a few years of experience in the area under your belt I would not.

It's nice to have all good concepts under one cover, but reading a pages long book that will tell you the history of GIT and SVN is pointless This book is considered a cornerstone of the DevOps movement. It's nice to have all good concepts under one cover, but reading a pages long book that will tell you the history of GIT and SVN is pointless in my opinion.

Most of the ideas presented in the book could be wrapped in one long yet succinct blog post. View 1 comment. Mar 23, Eduards Sizovs rated it it was amazing. Whether you are a developer, operations or manager, you will find essential knowledge to improve your work an expand your comfortable zone. I personally found some ever-missing pieces of the puzzle that baffled me on past projects and now I can easily give competent answers to what went wrong and how we could have improved.

The vast experience of the authors, seen as advices and examples throughout the book, is valuable lesson both for working on existing project or realizing a start-up idea! One of the must-read books! Feb 19, Serge Boucher rated it it was amazing. Apr 29, Chris Wood rated it it was amazing Shelves: Technologists operate in a fast-moving environment. Languages rise and fall. Application strategies constantly shift across new hardware. Presentation layers move between thick and thin client across desktop, laptop, tablet, and phone architectures.

For that reason, technology writers produce materials that have a relatively short shelf life. Every now and then, books are published which make a lasting contribution to the field of computer science and software delivery i. Knuth's Art of Comput Technologists operate in a fast-moving environment.

Knuth's Art of Computer Programming or Brooks' Mythical Man Month and find interested readers regularly pulling them off their shelves. Continuous Delivery by Farley and Humble is one such book.

Combining an uncanny vision for emerging technology trends, awareness of available delivery tools, massive experience in the realm of software delivery, and well articulated delivery strategies, the authors offer a relatively vendor-agnostic discussion of the delivery pipeline that ensures code quality, quick time-to-market, and painless release processes.

This book is highly relevant for anyone involved in the field of technology: Oct 25, Mark Seemann rated it did not like it Shelves: Some years ago, I had the fortune to attend Jes Humble's workshop on continuous delivery. It was a good workshop, well delivered, and I learned a lot. I was, therefore, surprised that it turned out to be such a struggle to read this book.

It's not that I disagree with the contents, but it's so boring! Each page is mostly a wall of text, with no diagrams, sidebars, illustrations, or even bulleted lists. Even when there's an occasional diagram, it seems strangely unhelpful. While it could be that th Some years ago, I had the fortune to attend Jes Humble's workshop on continuous delivery. The Lean Startup. Eric Ries. The Robert C.

Martin Clean Code Collection Collection. Ben Horowitz. Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software. Erich Gamma.

User Stories Applied: For Agile Software Development. Morning Star. Pierce Brown. The Innovator's Dilemma. Clayton M.

Designing Data-Intensive Applications. Martin Kleppmann.

Reward Yourself

Nicole Forsgren. Elon Musk. Ashlee Vance. Fire and Fury. Michael Wolff. Thinking, Fast and Slow. Daniel Kahneman. The Five Dysfunctions of a Team.

Patrick M. Mark Manson. Golden Son. Start with Why. Simon Sinek. Red Rising. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Philip K. Chaos Monkeys. Antonio Garcia Martinez. How to win friend and influence people.

Dale carnegie. Dan Brown. The Fifth Risk. Michael Lewis.

Continuous Delivery in Java

Up and Running. Kelsey Hightower. The Go Programming Language. Alan A. Dan Lyons. Radical Candor: Kim Scott. The Clean Coder. The Power of Habit. Charles Duhigg. Implementing Domain-Driven Design. Vaughn Vernon. Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C.

Micah Martin. Iron Gold. The Name of the Wind. Patrick Rothfuss. Yuval Noah Harari. Lean Analytics. Alistair Croll. The Wise Man's Fear. Karl Matthias. Adam Grant. Service Design Patterns.

Robert Daigneau. Jake Knapp.

CLR via C. Jeffrey Richter. Gabriel Weinberg.Translated docs. They and our colleagues have taken organizations that struggled to deploy software once a year, into the world of Continuous Delivery, where releasing becomes routine.

But the principles are there. Contributor Summit. Most recently, he has been working in the trenches for site and later for Nokia to introduce DevOps and continuous delivery to those organizations. From Journeyman to Master. Sort order. Alistair Croll.