DZIENNICZEK FAUSTYNY PDF

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7 1 English Evaluative Concepts 2 in a Contemporary Devotional 3 Christian Text . A Comparative Study 4 of Dzienniczek by Faustyna Kowalska 5 and Its. PDF | Gomola offers an analysis of English translation of a contemporary A Comparative Study of Dzienniczek by Faustyna Kowalska and Its. PDF | Attempting to combine cultural history with translation studies, this A Comparative Study of Dzienniczek by Faustyna Kowalska and Its.


Dzienniczek Faustyny Pdf

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Oryginalny-Dzienniczek-sw.-Faustyny-pdf-Nie sfałszowany. Dzienniczek-sw.- Faustyny. Share Like Chat. More. Report; Add to album; Embed. I'd like to recommend the place where everyone could probably find dzienniczek siostra faustyny pdf writer, but probably, you would need to. M. Faustyny Kowalskiej oraz jej prorocką misję głoszenia światu "Dzienniczek" jest bogatym źródłem do poznawania tajemnicy miłosierdzia.

Conversely, the fact that the translators of Diary use many various terms for Ojczyzna that are never capitalized,15 means that the concept so strongly highlighted in the source text becomes rather diluted in the target text, and may be ignored by English readers. Such a process does not take place in the target text. According to Tabakowska 27 , diminutives may be regarded as an example of a cultural barrier made of grammar when- ever a Polish text is translated into a language lacking in diminutives, like English.

Table of contents

Each of these diminutive forms might have been replaced in the original text with their non-diminutive counter- parts with no loss to the denotation of the text. But what matters here is the connotation. Gomola impression as it ignores Polish diminutives altogether. Let us take into account duszyczka dim. All this means that Polish readers familiar with Christian mysticism and iconography will immediately notice the discrepancy between Dzienniczek and other works of the Christian tradition, perceiving the former as a text of much lower gravity and importance due to the presence of these diminutives.

Presumably the translators of Diary wished to avoid such radical solutions and decided to ignore this stylistic feature of Dzienniczek.

As a result, dusza is conceptualized as a feminine entity, and whenever Dzienniczek describes the intimate relationship between the soul and Jesus, this mystical union is grounded in a more basic con- ceptualization of a female—male relationship, often used iguratively in Christian mysticism.

Diary renders these archaic Polish forms with standard modern English adverbs or adverbial phrases, though not always consistently. Gomola same archaic Polish jako and an English reader encountering these sty- listically standard sentences is unaware that their original Polish versions difer signiicantly when it comes to style.

In one of the most disturbing passages of her text, Sister Faustyna shares with her readers what Jesus told her on the status of the saved in heaven: And when I looked at the sky I saw the stars and the moon shining. Do you see how great the diference is between the light of the moon and the light of the stars?

Such is the diference in heaven between the soul of a religious and the soul of a faithful Christian ; Kowalska Once again English readers of Diary receive a typical form of language, while better-educated Polish readers of Dzienniczek may get the impression that its language sounds sometimes bombastic.

dzienniczek siostra faustyny pdf writer

Reading Dzienniczek, it is hard to avoid an impres- sion that Jesus, Mary and Sister Faustyna speak in a very solemn or even pompous way. Gomola translation process. Its English counterpart seems to be a stylistically ameliorated version of the text that for many Polish readers is an example of rather poor devotional literature. At the same time, speciic evaluative concepts of the original that did not correspond to English evaluative concepts were suppressed or ignored in the target text.

Nonetheless, the popularity of Diary among English-speaking readers indicates that fundamental evaluative religious concepts such as a vision of God as both just and merciful, or concepts related to emotions, are shared by both Polish and English native speakers as members of the same Western culture.

Accessed 20 Aug Divine mercy in my soul. Stockbridge: Marian Press. International Journal of English Studies, 3, 1— On the priority of connotative over denotative meanings in Polish diminutives. Studies in Polish Linguistics, 8 1 , 1— Word learning and theory of mind.

Mann Ed. Some remarks on linguistic aspects of religion. Anglica Wratislaviensia, 48, 87— Lost and found in translation: A cultural history of translators and translating in early modern Europe. Wassenaar: NIAS. Metaphors for God: Why and how do our choices matter for humans? Pastoral Psychology, 53 3 , — An anthology of Christian mysticism. Collegeville: Liturgical Press.

San Francisco: St. Ignatius Press. Septuagint as Christian scripture. Its prehistory and the prob- lem of its canon.

Translating Values

How can mortal man understand the road he travels? Prospects and problems of the cognitive approach to religious metaphor. Feyaerts Ed. Berlin: Peter Lang.

Cognitive linguistics in the year International Journal of Cognitive Linguistics, 1 1 , 1— Religion: If there is no God. New Haven: Yale University Press. Metaphor and emotion: Language, culture, and body in human feeling.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Metaphor: A practical introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Symbols in action. A cognitive linguistic perspective. Brdar Eds. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Moral politics. It was copied for the irst time in the s by Sister Ksawera Olszamowska, 2 Janda writes that, according to some cognitive linguists including George Lakof , their discipline can be taken as a proof that God does not exist Gomola but the copy, intended for publication, contained a great deal of mistakes and omissions; some words and phrases were also added.

It was then that it was also edited and annotated. Once again, the copying and editorial works were carried out by clergymen and nuns, and the original manuscript has never been made available to independent researchers or scholars.

Yet at the same time it is diferent from other mystical texts of the past, because, most probably, its author was not familiar with the great Christian mystical tradition, and therefore, could not draw on its plentiful works. Isaiah 9: Actually, various linguistic aspects of Dzienniczek have already been analyzed by Polish researchers they were not, however, compared with their English translation, which we are doing here for the irst time.

Unfortunately, most of these analyses are not in English. For the most recent study of Christian mysti- cal language employing verbs of perception, see Gavrilyuk Still, this conceptual metaphor exem- pliies another evaluative concept common for Polish and English, and presumably understandable to all readers of the target text who are not native speakers of English, as it is the result of our embodied experience.

It may be found, for example, in two popular Latin hymns: Pange Lingua by Venantius Fortunatus and Ave verum corpus.

Sweetser points out that physical taste is the source domain for mental states in Indo-European languages On the one hand the Ptolemaic world represents an up- down image schema in which positive value is ascribed to the celestial sphere where God resides and negative value to the sublunary sphere inhabited by people.

Yet if we look at the Ptolemaic world through the prism of the centre-periphery image schema, then the celestial sphere receives a negative value and positive value is associated with the very centre of the universe, the very middle of the Earth, where, as we learn from the Divine Comedy, Satan lives. Gomola other cultures , for example the life is a journey metaphor is present in a simple poem by Kowalska in which she depicts human life as like navi- gating a boat across rough seas with God as a helmsman Millions of readers of Dzienniczek and its translations have found this idea compelling and reoriented their lives according to it, which is the most vivid example of the inluence of this devotional text.

Morality as accounting is an inte- gral part of the satisfaction theory of the atonement, one of the classic theological doctrines of Christianity, going back to Augustine of Hippo and developed in the eleventh century by Anselm of Canterbury.

Lakof discusses the Moral Accounting metaphor and its role in American poli- tics , while Sweetser presents the teaching of Jesus recorded in the Gospel of Matthew as a radical break with morality seen as accounting, and with a vision of God as a scrupulous bookkeeper to whom humans owe repayments for their debts sins.

On the one hand, Sister Faustyna writes of God as the Merciful Father, and on the other, she presents him as a strict ruler who is easily ofended by humans and expects amends, indeed a scrupulous bookkeeper.

As a result, the conceptualization of morality and of human relations with God in terms of accounting is less prominent in Diary. It is not entirely true, since what distinguishes Dzienniczek is the fact that some of its visions concern not the whole Church, but speciically Poland. It is possible to say that the Polish Romantic poets, following the early Wordsworth, Shelley, or some rep- resentatives of German Romanticism, were also preoccupied with new revolutionary ideas of Europe after the French Revolution, yet unlike their English or German counterparts, transferred them onto the reli- gious ground of Christianity.

It is not so much the result of the obvious fact that the target readers are non-Poles, but rather a con- sequence of the unique position of the concept of ojczyzna in the world- view of native speakers of Polish. What is more, Dzienniczek may be interpreted by Poles as a devotional text directed to them as Christians and Poles, rather than just to Christians in general. In this way Ojczyzna, as a consistent term visible in Dzienniczek and related to an important evaluative concept, has political consequences.

Conversely, the fact that the translators of Diary use many various terms for Ojczyzna that are never capitalized,15 means that the concept so strongly highlighted in the source text becomes rather diluted in the target text, and may be ignored by English readers. Such a process does not take place in the target text. According to Tabakowska Each of these diminutive forms might have been replaced in the original text with their non-diminutive counter- parts with no loss to the denotation of the text.

But what matters here is the connotation. Gomola impression as it ignores Polish diminutives altogether.

Let us take into account duszyczka dim. All this means that Polish readers familiar with Christian mysticism and iconography will immediately notice the discrepancy between Dzienniczek and other works of the Christian tradition, perceiving the former as a text of much lower gravity and importance due to the presence of these diminutives.

Presumably the translators of Diary wished to avoid such radical solutions and decided to ignore this stylistic feature of Dzienniczek. As a result, dusza is conceptualized as a feminine entity, and whenever Dzienniczek describes the intimate relationship between the soul and Jesus, this mystical union is grounded in a more basic con- ceptualization of a female—male relationship, often used iguratively in Christian mysticism.

Diary renders these archaic Polish forms with standard modern English adverbs or adverbial phrases, though not always consistently.

Or note the sentence describing her mystical union with God: Gomola same archaic Polish jako and an English reader encountering these sty- listically standard sentences is unaware that their original Polish versions difer signiicantly when it comes to style. In one of the most disturbing passages of her text, Sister Faustyna shares with her readers what Jesus told her on the status of the saved in heaven: Do you see how great the diference is between the light of the moon and the light of the stars?

Such is the diference in heaven between the soul of a religious and the soul of a faithful Christian ; Kowalska Once again English readers of Diary receive a typical form of language, while better-educated Polish readers of Dzienniczek may get the impression that its language sounds sometimes bombastic.

Reading Dzienniczek, it is hard to avoid an impres- sion that Jesus, Mary and Sister Faustyna speak in a very solemn or even pompous way.

Gomola translation process. Its English counterpart seems to be a stylistically ameliorated version of the text that for many Polish readers is an example of rather poor devotional literature.

At the same time, speciic evaluative concepts of the original that did not correspond to English evaluative concepts were suppressed or ignored in the target text. Nonetheless, the popularity of Diary among English-speaking readers indicates that fundamental evaluative religious concepts such as a vision of God as both just and merciful, or concepts related to emotions, are shared by both Polish and English native speakers as members of the same Western culture.

Accessed 20 Aug Divine mercy in my soul. Marian Press. International Journal of English Studies, 3, 1— On the priority of connotative over denotative meanings in Polish diminutives. Studies in Polish Linguistics, 8 1 , 1— Word learning and theory of mind.

Translating Values

Mann Ed. Some remarks on linguistic aspects of religion. Anglica Wratislaviensia, 48, 87— Lost and found in translation: A cultural history of translators and translating in early modern Europe.

Metaphors for God: Why and how do our choices matter for humans? Pastoral Psychology, 53 3 , — An anthology of Christian mysticism. Liturgical Press. Perceiving God in Western Christianity.

Cambridge University Press. Selected essays.

Basic Books. San Francisco: Ignatius Press.

Septuagint as Christian scripture. Its prehistory and the prob- lem of its canon.Quoting Santayana, cited by Cliford Geertz Linguists may ind there are various instances corroborating the link 36 between language, thought, and embodiment,1 while researchers inter- 37 ested in the translation process may examine to what extent concepts 38 present in such texts—many of them language or culture-speciic—may 39 be transferred into other languages or cultures.

Such is the diference in heaven between the soul of a religious and the soul of a faithful Christian ; Kowalska Skip to main content.

Patron of the publishing the Diary was taken by Fr. Prospects and problems of the cognitive approach to religious metaphor. Slovene nominal diminutives and their English equivalents: For the most recent study of Christian mysti- cal language employing verbs of perception, see Gavrilyuk Gomola 20 be their strength.